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BIOL 142

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Biol. 142: Physiology Laboratory: Spring 2015

Instructor 

Dr. Nanette Tomicek

Title 

Lecturer

Office Phone 

814-865-3150

Office Address 

005 Thomas

Office Hours 

TAs will hold weekly office hours in room 007

E-mail 

njt128@psu.edu

Location 

007/017 Thomas

Times 

Check your student schedule

 

Required Text

Physiology Laboratory Manual Second Ed. John R. Waters and Nanette J. Tomicek ISBN 978-0-7380-5877-1

Suggested Text

Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology 10ed. by Martini, Nath, and Bartholomew. to be used as a reference

Course Objectives

Develop a vocabulary of appropriate terminology to effectively communicate information related physiology.

Recognize the anatomical structures andexplain the physiological functions of body systems.

Recognize and explain the principle ofhomeostasis and the use of feedback loops to control physiological systems inthe human body.

Recognize and explain the interrelationshipswithin and between physiological systems of the human body.

Synthesize ideas to make a connection betweenknowledge of anatomy and physiology and real-world situations, includinghealthy lifestyle decisions and homeostatic imbalances.

Demonstrate laboratory procedures used toevaluate physiological functions of each organ system.

Interpret graphs and figures of physiologicaldata.

Communicate clearly and in a way that reflectsknowledge and understanding of the human body.

Tentative Schedule

We will perform a variety of experiments where we will demonstrate and investigate the physiology of body systems. Before you come to the lab, be sure that you review the information in the lab book  for that laboratory. Supplementary information may be found under the lessons tab ANGEL. You should have already been introduced to this material in lecture, but we encourage you to still take time to review the material. When you have a lab quiz, there will be pre-lab questions that will cover lesson assigned for that day (plus questions covering the lab and questions in the lab book from the previous week).

 

 

Week:

Lab Exercise:

Quizzes and Assignments:

Jan. 12- 16

Introduction to physiology laboratory. Course requirements, expectations, and policies will be covered. Attendance is mandatory.

 NO Quiz

Jan. 19-23

All labs canceled due to Martin Luther King Day

 Study the syllabus and tutorials for next weeks quiz!

Jan. 26 -30

Electroencephalography (EEG)

  1. EEG lesson
  2. Read EEG intro in lab book

Quiz 1
will cover the syllabus (6 pts), and ask you to define four terms (4 pts) from the materials assigned to you this week (see details to the left).

Your first lab report (results/discussion) will be on the EEG lab you do this week (due in two weeks). Please read the writing guidelines #1 and the sample lab report (see "Lessons" tab for both).

Feb. 2-6

Electromyography (EMG)

  1. EMG lesson
  2. EMG intro in lab book

Quiz 2
will ask you to define four terms (4 pts) from the materials assigned to you for THIS week (see details to the left). You will also be asked more detailed questions about the lab and readings you completed LAST week (6 pts).

 Feb.9-13

Skeletal Muscle, Motor Units, and the Neuromuscular Junction

  1. NMJ lesson
  2. Fainting in lab in lab book
  3. NMJ intro in lab book
     

Quiz 3
will ask you to define four terms (4 pts) from the materials assigned to you for THIS week (see details to the left). You will also be asked more detailed questions about the lab and readings you completed LAST week (6 pts). First Lab report due in class (5 points).

Feb. 16-20

Cardiac Activity (Frog heart lab)

  1. Heart lesson
  2. Read cardiac activity intro in lab book
  3. Fill in expected effects in table 1, leave room to add observed effects when you complete the lab in class.

Quiz 4
will ask you to define four terms (4 pts) from the materials assigned to you for THIS week (see details to the left). You will also be asked more detailed questions about the lab and readings you completed LAST week (6 pts). Please read the writing guidelines #2 and the sample lab report (see "Lessons" tab for both).

Feb. 23-27

Water Balance and Renal Physiology

  1. Renal lesson
  2. Read water balance and renal physiology in lab book

Also everyone will be a subject this week!

 

  1. Please avoid alcohol and caffeine for eight hours before your lab period. Alcohol, caffeine, and other drugs interfere with normal kidney function.
     
  2. At the beginning of  lab, everyone will drink one liter (about a quart - the equilvant of two red plastic solo cups you might see at parties sometimes) of water, soda, or  juice. Only three people in each section will drink soda or juice. Everyone else will drink tap water. We will provide the soda and juice. If you perfer not to drink tap water from the water fountian, you are welcome to bring your own bottled water 1 liter (1000 ml).
     
  3. Right before you come to lab, please make it a point to go to a bathroom and empty your bladder.

Quiz 5
will ask you to define four terms (4 pts) from the materials assigned to you for THIS week (see details to the left). You will also be asked more detailed questions about the lab and readings you completed LAST week (6 pts).

Mar. 3-6

 CLASS CANCELLED

           Friday afternoon office hours only

Mar. 9-13

Spring Break No Class

           

Mar.16-20

Respiratory volume, mechanics, and pH regulation

  1. Respiratory lesson
  2. Repiratory volumes, mechanics, and pH intro in lab book

 

Quiz 6:
will ask you to define four terms (4 pts) from the materials assigned to you for THIS week (see details to the left). You will also be asked more detailed questions about the lab and readings you completed LAST week (6 pts). Second Lab report due in class (5 points).

Mar. 23-27

Heart sounds and blood pressure

  1. Blood pressure lesson 
  2. Heart sounds and blood pressure intro in lab book           

 

Quiz 7:
will ask you to define four terms (4 pts) from the materials assigned to you for THIS week (see details to the left). You will also be asked more detailed questions about the lab and readings you completed LAST week (6 pts). 

Mar. 30- Apr. -3

ECG Read

  1. ECG lesson
  2. ECG and Hemodynamics in lab book

Room 007 TAs will assign tasks for the Ex Phys lab this week during down time at the end of class. Look over the Ex Phys tasks so you are prepared.

Quiz 8:

will ask you to define four terms (4 pts) from the materials assigned to you for THIS week (see details to the left). You will also be asked more detailed questions about the lab and readings you completed LAST week (6 pts).

Apr. 6-10

Room 007 Exercise Physiology

You MUST read over all of the jobs BEFORE coming to the lab. You should have been assigned a single task the week before, but it is critical you understand how all jobs fit together to accomlish the lab. Your TA will count how prepared you are for class heavily when they calculate your participation points.

Room 017 Sensory Physiology

Read Sensory Physiology in lab book intros  for touch, vision and hearing.

You will be assigned an Ex phys job by your TA

Room 007: No Quiz

Room 017: Quiz 9
will ask you to define terms (4pts) from the sensory lab assigned to you for THIS week (there is no lesson just use information in the lab book).You will also be asked more detailed questions about the ECG lab (7 pts).

Apr. 13-17

Room 007 Sensory Physiology

Read Sensory Physiology in lab book intros  for touch, vision and hearing

Room 017 Exercise Physiology

You MUST read over all of the jobs BEFORE coming to the lab. You should have been assigned a single task the week before, but it is critical you understand how all jobs fit together to accomlish the lab. Your TA will count how prepared you are for class heavily when they calculate your participation points.

 Room 007: Quiz 9
will ask you to define terms (4pts) from the sensory lab assigned to you for THIS week (there is no lesson just use information in the lab book).You will also be asked more detailed questions about the ECG lab (7 pts).

Room 017: No Quiz.

Apr. 20-24

You will take quiz 10, and fill out course evaluations this week.

 

Quiz 10:You will also be asked more detailed questions about the sensory lab (4 points) and the equipment and methods using during the ex phys lab (3 points). You will calculate CO2 clearace, O2 consumption, or MAP (3 points). Room 007 students your final lab report (20 points) is due this week.

Apr. 27- May 2

Optional final cumulative quiz 11  (Participation is optional and the score will replace your next lowest quiz score - this quiz is optional and can only work in your favor).

One of your lowest quizzes is automatically dropped in ANGEL upon completion of the 10th quiz.
 

 

Quiz 11:If you plan to take the final cumulative quiz, the best way to study would be to look over the discussion questions in the lab manual, the questions in the tutorials, and your old quizzes.

There will be ~40 multiple choice questions worth a maximum of 10 points total. Room 017 students your final lab report (20 points) is due this week. If you are not taking the optional final and want to turn your paper in early there is a dropbox outside 017. Your papers are due at the start of your scheduled lab time. 

 Grading Policy

Your grade will be based on the assignments and participation points listed in the table below. Please read the description of each assignment carefully. There is no extra credit of any kind.

ASSIGNMENT

Points Each

Points Total

Best 9 out of 10 quizzes
(an optional cumulative quiz can also replace 1 more of the quiz scores)

10

90

2 small writing assignments

5

10

1 formal laboratory write-up

20

20

laboratory participation points

15

15

TOTAL COURSE POINTS

 

135

 

If the average course grade is 70% or greater, final grades follow a standard curve where: A >92%; A- >90%; B+ >88%; B >82%; B- >80%; C+>78%; C>70%; D>60%; and F< 60%. There is no "rounding up" so if you earn 89.6% of the course points for instance, then your final course grade will be a B+ since you would still be below the 90% cut-off for the A-. If the average course grade is below 70%, slightly lower cut-offs may be calculated based upon the average course grade and standard deviation.

Quizzes

Quizzes will usually be given at the beginning of the lab period. Quiz questions will cover the results and interpretation of the previous week's lab (~6 points) and the background and methods for the lab being done that day (~4 points). Read  and review the current and past weeks lessons before coming to class. Quiz questions will be multiple choice and short answer. There are no make-up quizzes for the weekly quiz, but your lowest score (0 if you missed a quiz) will be dropped. In addition, you can choose to replace the next one lowest quiz score with the grade you earn on the optional cumulative quiz. Please understand that if you are late to class or absent for any reason, then you will receive a 0 for that quiz. NOONE Can make you miss a regularly scheudled class.

How the dropped quiz scores and optional cumulative quiz work:

You will take ten quizzes during the semester. If you are happy with nine of those scores, then we will use your best nine scores to calculate your grade (along with the writing assignments and participation points), and you are done for the semester. However, if you would like to take the optional cumulative quiz, then you can replace your next lowest of those scores with whatever grade you earn on the optional cumulative quiz. If you do not earn a higher score on the optional cumulative quiz than your lowest remaining quiz scores, then the final will not be factored into your grade (i.e., taking the optional cumulative quiz cannot hurt your grade).

Writing Assignments

There will be three writing assignments during the semester. You are encouraged to discuss the laboratories with your lab partners, but remember that the actual writing part must be done individually. Any papers that are obviously group efforts, or that are not COMPLETELY ORIGINAL will be treated as plagiarism. They start off as small five point assignments, and build to a twenty point formal scientific paper.

 

Individual Assignments

These two assignments (1 intro/method, 1 results/discussion) give you the opportunity to develop your scientific writing skills and demonstrate what you have learned.

Formal Laboratory Write-up

This assignment brings together everything that you have learned in the previous writing assignments and is worth the greatest number of points.

 

You can have any writing assignment reviewed by a TA before you hand it in for a grade. There is no reason not to get an A on any writing assignment. Please keep the following points in mind while planning your assignments.

TAs will only review assignments during office hours. It would be best then to start the assignment as soon as possible so that the material is fresh in your mind and you will have time to show it to your TA and make revisions. Do not wait until the last minute. Remember that your TA has other classes and responsibilities, and is not at your disposal 24 hours per day.

The TAs do NOT have time to review a first draft of your report. As college students, we expect your reports to be free of grammar, style, and spelling errors before you bring them in for review. Your TA should be reading a third or fourth draft, NOT a first draft. Consider the time your TA spends on your report as a chance to get feedback on how you have addressed the physiologic concepts.

If you need help with grammar, style, or spelling, take your report to one of Penn State's Undergraduate Writing Centers BEFORE showing it to your TA. If you bring a report to your TA with significant grammar, style, or spelling errors, your TA may reject your report, and not provide any feedback until you have addressed the other errors.

You are welcome to talk with Biol. 142 TAs from other sections instead of your own TA, but remember that they will not be grading your assignments, and your TA is not bound by anything another TA or anyone at the writing center tells you. However, all TAs are happy to try to help you as much as possible. If you are having any problems that cannot be solved by a TA, please feel free to see the laboratory coordinator. All writing assignments (including drafts given to your TA for review) must be typewritten and double spaced with a one inch margin all around. Do not use any font smaller than 11 pt. If the assignment is longer than a single page, the pages must be stapled in the upper left corner. All assignments must include the name of the author. Any assignment that does not meet these criteria may be returned ungraded and you will receive a zero for that assignment.

Re-Grades

Your TA will grade all of your tests and assignments. If you feel that you have been graded unfairly, discuss the matter with your TA first. If the two of you cannot come to an agreement, you may submit the assignment to the laboratory coordinator to be re-graded. Please note the following conditions for all assignments submitted for regrading.

The assignment must be handed into the laboratory coordinator  within one week of the day it was handed back to the class.

A type written sheet explaining what item(s) is/are to be re-graded and why you think that you should receive the points must be stapled to the original assignment. Do not write your explanation in the margins of the original assignment.

Any re-grade that does not meet the above conditions will be returned to you unread with no opportunity to be resubmitted.

The laboratory coordinator reserves the right to re-grade the entire assignment. If your TA was generous while grading other sections of the assignment, it is possible for your grade to go down. The re-grade on any assignment will be the final grade on that assignment.

Given the number of students and TAs involved in this course, assignments submitted for re-grading will not be returned until the end of finals week.

Late Assignments

One point or 10 percent (whichever is greater) will be deducted for each day that an assignment is late. Crashing hard drives, damaged disks, and malfunctioning printers have become as common as homework eating dogs when assignments are due. None are acceptable excuses for turning in work late. Make back-ups of all of your work. Notify your TA immediately (before the due date) if you are having any problems.

Attendance Policy

This physiology laboratory is designed as a "hands-on" course, and all students receiving a grade for the course are expected to participate fully in all laboratory exercises. The participation points will be awarded for active participation. At the end of the semester, your TA will look at his or her records to determine your overall participation. Excellent participation will be awarded 15 points, good participation will be awarded 13-14 points, mediocre participation will be awarded 11-12 points, etc. If you miss more than one or two laboratory periods, you can expect to receive 10 or fewer participation points. Your TA has the discretion to deduct additional points for coming to class late or leaving early, failing to follow directions (especially when we are using animals or their tissues), coming to class poorly prepared, academic integrity, or other issues approved by the laboratory coordinator. If you must arrive to a laboratory late or leave early, notify your TA ahead of time. If you do not notify your TA, or if arriving late/leaving early becomes excessive, one point may be taken off of your assignment grade or participation points the first time, two points the second time, and so forth. Students with medical/physical disabilities, which prohibit their participation in physical education classes, may be exempted from participating in certain labs due to their active nature. Please talk with your TA or the laboratory coordinator if you have any concerns about participating in a laboratory. With advance warning, we can often make some sort of accommodation.

 

Attending the laboratories is mandatory.

 

We expect you to attend your regularly scheduled lab section. Activities that conflict with your scheduled lab section, like rushing sororities, fraternities, and participating in THON are extracurricular activities. These can be an important part of some students' college experience, but they do not have priority over your academic responsibilities. The students coordinating these programs understand that too, and they will work with you if you must miss one of their meetings to attend your scheduled classes. In fact, even your professors in other courses who want to give an evening exam must arrange an alternative for you if you have a scheduled evening course. NO ONE CAN FORCE YOU TO MISS A REGULARLY SCHEDULED CLASS. 

Please remember that earning your degree is the number one reason you are working so hard as a Penn State student. It is also unfair to the other students in the course to crowd their lab section with extra students who do not want to attend their assigned section. With almost 100 lab sections and over 1800 students in the Anatomy and Physiology labs each year, we cannot accommodate all of the requests we have been receiving. The TAs do the best they can to try to help you out, but our lab courses are too big and our lab activities are too complex to accommodate all of your personal and extracurricular schedules. Please work with your organization or instructors to arrange some sort of alternative if there is a meeting that conflicts with our class. The TAs and I expect you to attend your regularly scheduled lab section.

If you must miss a laboratory, contact your TA before your lab meets. TA email addresses and phone numbers are listed under the Lessons tab in Angel. If you must miss a lab, you can work with your TA to schedule a different laboratory section that week. You MUST have your TA's permission to attend another lab period. Walk-ins not approved by your TA, are NOT allowed. If it is not possible to contact your TA before your absence, then contact your TA before the next regularly scheduled lab period.

Please Note: As adults, it is your responsibility to provide reasonable verification of an absence; each situation is unique, and we are flexible. Remember that University Health Services will not provide you with a note for minor illnesses. Documentation of illness, car trouble, etc. may be requested for absences that were not pre-approved. Absences for interviews, appointments, etc. are permitted but must be approved ahead of time.

In the case of EXCUSED absences where you were not present for a quiz, you must schedule a make-up quiz with your TA BEFORE the end of that week (the Friday immediately following your absence). If you do not make up a quiz before the end of the week, then the missed quiz will be one of your dropped quiz grades.

In the case of EXCUSED absences where you miss a lab, and then have to turn in a report on that lab, your TA will deduct two letter grades (20%) from that lab report.

If your absence is UNEXCUSED, your TA may not accept any report or work assigned that day and/or any assignment due that day. You would therefore receive a zero for those quizzes and assignments.

Exam Policy

Please see "Quizzes" above.

Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty is not limited to simply cheating on an exam or assignment. The following is quoted directly from the "PSU Faculty Senate Policies for Students" regarding academic integrity and academic dishonesty: 

"Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly activity free from fraud and deception and is an educational objective of this institution. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarizing, fabricating of information or citations, facilitating acts of academic dishonesty by others, having unauthorized possession of examinations, submitting work of another person or work previously used without informing the instructor, or tampering with the academic work of other students." 

All University and Eberly College of Science policies regarding academic integrity/academic dishonesty apply to this course and the students enrolled in this course. Refer to the following URL for further details on the academic integrity policies of the Eberly College of Science. Each student in this course is expected to work entirely on her/his own while taking any exam, to complete assignments on her/his own effort without the assistance of others unless directed otherwise by the instructor, and to abide by University and Eberly College of Science policies about academic integrity and academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty can result in assignment of "F" by the course instructors or "XF" by Judicial Affairs as the final grade for the student. 

 

Academic dishonesty (in any form), will not be tolerated in this course.

 

Sanctions may include all or just part of the following:

1. an F on a particular paper or exam,

2. letters describing the infraction being placed in a file kept by the Academic Integrity Committee in the Eberly College of Science (Note: all colleges at Penn State have an Academic Integrity Committee, and files are routinely requested from other colleges during an investigation),

3. referral to the Office of Judicial Affairs,

4. an F or XF (disciplinary F grade) for the course.

When you are completing writing assignments for this course, it is important to remember that your instructors expect you to do your own work. Lab partners may not turn in the same assignment. You are expected to work on your assignments individually. Each person's assignment should be an original work (this includes graphs and figures). Be careful not to turn in assignments that appear to be your own work, but actually paraphrase another student's work, the lab book, or a text book (this includes using other people's work as "templates" to get you started). Please speak with your TA or the laboratory coordinator if you have any questions.

Disciplinary Issues

All of the students and the instructors in this course are expected to work together to maintain a safe learning environment. Anyone caught entering a laboratory or office without authorization, stealing anything from the laboratories, damaging laboratory equipment/supplies/furnishings, or treating any member of the laboratory with disrespect or in a harassing or hostile manner can expect to be removed from the course, assigned an F for the course, and have the matter referred as appropriate to the Office of Judicial Affairs and/or Police Services.

 

Animal Use

In this laboratory, you will use both frogs and rats during the semester. The purpose of using animals in laboratory experiments is to provide you with the opportunity to handle living animals and observe directly the response of specific body systems to various environmental stimuli and experimental procedures. This type of learning experience cannot be provided by film/video, computer simulations, or preserved animal material.

All experiments using animals in this course have been approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) at Penn State University, which is reviewed annually by the United State’s Department of Agriculture (USDA) to confirm that the terms set by the Animal Welfare Act are followed. All of the TAs in this course have received training in animal handling, anesthesia, surgery, post-operative care, and euthanasia.

In the event that you have any questions or concerns regarding animal use in the physiology laboratories that cannot be answered by your TA, please feel free to speak with Nanette Tomicek (Mueller lab). If there is a situation where you feel that speaking with Nanette Tomicek is not enough, you should contact the Office for Regulatory Compliance (ORProtections@psu.edu, 865-1775). You can get more information about registering animal use concerns from the Office for Regulatory Compliance web site. Anyone that needlessly causes an animal stress/pain, or fails to treat a living or euthanized animal with respect, will be removed from the laboratory and may receive an F for that laboratory.

Disability Policy

Penn State welcomes students with disabilities into the University's educational programs. If you have a disability-related need for reasonable academic adjustments in this course, contact the Office for Disability Services (ODS) at 814-863-1807 (V/TTY). For further information regarding ODS, please visit the Office for Disability Services Web site. In order to receive consideration for course accommodations, you must contact ODS and provide documentation (see the documentation guidelines). If the documentation supports the need for academic adjustments, ODS will provide a letter identifying appropriate academic adjustments. Please share this letter and discuss the adjustments with your instructor as early in the course as possible. You must contact ODS and request academic adjustment letters at the beginning of each semester.”

Miscellaneous

Cell Phones and Electronic Messaging

It is not appropriate to receive or transmit phone calls or instant messages while you are in the laboratory. Turn off the sound on your cell phones before you come to class. If there is an urgent reason for you to receive a message, discuss the matter with the laboratory coordinator or your TA before class. Students that disrupt the class with cell phones or any other means of electronic communication will have participation points deducted from their final grade.

 

Questions and Concerns

If possible, see your TA first with questions concerning the information covered in laboratory or the daily operation of your laboratory section. If your question is not resolved, or if you have other concerns, please feel free to contact:

Dr. Nanette J. Tomicek : Anatomy & Physiology Lecturer and Laboratory Coordinator

Mueller lab; njt128@psu.edu