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BIOL 469 Luscher

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SYLLABUS
Biol/Bhh 469, FALL 2013 Mon, Wed, Fri 12:20 – 01:10  
NEUROBIOLOGY 102 Thomas

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION / LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will acquire an understanding of basic neurobiology including terminology of neuronal structures and functions and experimental approaches designed to integrate the principles of neural cell biology, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuroendocrinology, neuropharmacology, genetics and molecular biology. The material is divided into the following major subject areas:

 

I. Neural structures, organelles and membrane properties important for neural function

II. Neurotransmitters, receptors, ion channels and 2nd messenger systems underlying neurotransmission

III. Embryonic structures, molecules and signaling mechanisms underlying brain development

IV. Mechanisms underlying learning and memory as well as defects underlying select cognitive/neurodegenerative disorders

 

COURSE DIRECTOR Bernhard Luscher, Ph.D.

                                        Prof. of Biology, BMB and Psychiatry

Email:   BXL25@psu.edu (please add Biol469 to subject line)

Office: 209 Life Sciences

Office hours:   Friday 2 – 3 PM 

Teaching Assistant: Casey Kilpatrick

Teaching Assist email: cuk152@psu.edu

Teaching Assist office hours: Wednesdays, 2-3 PM, look for Casey in 208 Life Sciences

  

LECTURE NOTES 

can be downloaded from Angel as ppt files at the latest by the end of the day following a class. You are free to change or print these files in any format you like. Reading these files is not sufficient to do well in this class.

 

PRE-REQUISITES: 

Biol 240 or Biol 230 or BMB251/252

 

RESOURCES YOU WILL NEED:

1. Access to ANGEL 

2. Textbook: Principles of Neural Science, Fifth Edition, by Kandel, Schwarz, Jessel, Spiegelbaum and Hudspeth, McGraw-Hill, 2013, ISBN: 978-0-07-139011-8 or (eBook) 978-0-07-181001-2. (The fourth edition of this book is acceptable also)

3. i>clicker (Penn State Bookstore, Amazon.com, etc.). Make sure the clicker is set to the correct frequency used in our classroom.  Register the device (http://www.iclicker.com/registration) at your earliest convenience (complete the fields with your first name, last name, student ID, and remote ID). Your student ID should be your Access Account ID, i.e., the user name that forms the first part of your PSU email address and that you use to login to ANGEL. DO NOT enter your 9-digit student number. The remote ID is the series of numbers and sometimes letters found on the bottom of the back of your i>clicker remote. If you lose your clicker before it is registered then all clicker credits will be lost. Clicker manual: http://clc.its.psu.edu/sites/default/files/uploads/studenticlickerhandout.pdf

 

EXAM FORMAT AND SCHEDULE: 

There will be three in-class mid-term examinations plus one final exam. Each exam will have approx. 40 multiple choice questions. Your best 2 of 3 midterms will count towards the final grade, 30 percent of the grade each; the lowest exam score will be dropped. The final exam will count for 30 percent. Final exam will be ~1/2 cumulative; the other half will specifically address material discussed after the third exam. The final exam will be scheduled separately during finals week and is mandatory. Exams in total will count for 90% of the final grade. The remaining 10% of the grade will be based on class participation (see below) 

 

Exam scores will be reported by email to your student access account after they have been processed by University Testing Services. It is your responsibility to learn to use your account, and check your posted scores for accuracy. Take your student ID card to the CAC help desk at either 215 Computer Building (3-2494) or 12 Willard (3-1035) to learn how to use your account. 

 

A missed exam can be skipped (top 2 of 3 midterm exams count for final grade), or you can choose to take an essay format make-up exam. Make up exams are only given for acceptable reasons (serious illness, family emergency etc.). In order to qualify for a make up exam you have to give notice at least two days prior to the exam and it must be taken BEFORE the next exam. Be advised that exam scores are generally lower on make-up exams.

 

I-CLICKERS: 

10% of the grade will be given for class participation as measured by i>clicker usage. i>clicker will be used most days in class for questions, and you are responsible for bringing your remote to class. Students who show participation in >70% of the classes tat use clickers will receive 10% credit towards the final grade. Partial credit will not be issued, and there will be no opportunities for makeup. You will be graded on participation only, not on accuracy of answers. Students are solely responsible to ensure their clicker is working and that they are using it properly. They are expected to attend ALL classes. Therefore, malfunctioning clickers, clickers forgotten at home or lost, losing clicker points due to failure to register the clicker before it was lost or stolen, late arrival in class after clicker questions are completed, absence due to illness, family issues or any other reasons cannot be used as an excuse for missing the minimum requirements for participation credit.  Using someone else’s clicker constitutes a serious violation of Penn State’s violation of Academic integrity. I-Clicker credit will be computed at the very end of the semester.

 

GRADES: 

The following scale gives approximate assignments for final grades. This scale is based on an overall class mean of 70% and may be adjusted downward if class mean is Lower. It will NOT be adjusted upwards, so if you all do well, you all win. Grades/percentage: A, A-, 85–100; B+, B, B-, 70-84.99; C, C+, 57-69.99; D, 50-56.99; F < 50

 

Study guide/last year’s exams. Exam questions used in an earlier Biol 469 class will be provided as a study guide accessible on Angel a few weeks prior to exams. Note that the material might not follow the exact same schedule every year. 

 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: 

In an examination setting, unless the instructor gives explicit prior instructions to the contrary, violations of academic integrity shall consist of any attempt to receive assistance from written or printed aids, from any person or papers or electronic devices, or of any attempt to give assistance, whether the student doing so has completed his or her own work or not.  Other violations include, but are not limited to, any attempt to gain an unfair advantage in regard to an examination, such as tampering with a graded exam or claiming another's work to be one's own.  Other assessments are expected to represent your own independent work unless specifically stated otherwise.  Failure to comply will lead to sanctions against the student in accordance with the Policy on Academic Integrity in the Eberly College of Science. 

 

THE EBERLY COLLEGE OF SCIENCE CODE OF MUTUAL RESPECT AND COOPERATION 

(www.science.psu.edu/climate/Code-of-Mutual-Respect final.pdf) embodies the values that we hope our faculty, staff, and students possess and will endorse to make The Eberly College of Science a place where every individual feels respected and valued, as well as challenged and rewarded.

 

THE EBERLY COLLEGE OF SCIENCE IS COMMITTED TO THE ACADEMIC SUCCESS of students enrolled in the College's courses and undergraduate programs. When in need of help, students can utilize various College and University wide resources for learning assistance.  http://www.science.psu.edu/advising/success"   

 

ACCESSIBILITY:  

Penn State welcomes students with disabilities into the University's educational programs. If you have a disability-related need for reasonable academic adjustments in this course, contact the Office for Disability Services (ODS) at 814-863-1807 (V/TTY). For further information regarding ODS, please visit the Office for Disability Services Web site (http://equity.psu.edu/ods/). 

In order to receive consideration for course accommodations, you must contact ODS and provide documentation (see the documentation guidelines at http://equity.psu.edu/ods/guidelines/documentation-guidelines). If the documentation supports the need for academic adjustments, ODS will provide a letter identifying appropriate academic adjustments. Please share this letter and discuss the adjustments with your instructor as early in the course as possible. You must contact ODS and request academic adjustment letters at the beginning of each semester.”

 

HOW TO DO WELL IN THIS CLASS

1. COME TO CLASS – you not only need to do this to get the participation credit, but you can learn what will help you do well in exams by seeing what the lecturer emphasizes. It can be tempting to skip out on review sessions, but this is where we will go over all the important concepts for the exam.

2. Take notes and ask questions - it will help you to stay alert and to realize what you do or don’t understand.

3. Work in small groups – quiz each other, design your own exam questions, share and discuss them.

4. Compare and contrast material from multiple lectures – make sure you understand how they relate and ask if you don’t understand. If you find you are weak on some of the basic biology background, actively seek to fill it in before you fall behind. I can help suggest resources if necessary. 

5. Make your own summary drawings and lists of concepts (of a neuron, its receptors, synapses, neural structures etc.) – do you know how it all works? Memorizing lists without understanding concepts will probably not be enough to excel.

6. Come to office hours or email the professor if you need help!

 

RESOURCES ON THE WWW THAT CAN HELP YOUR STUDIES:

http://icarus.med.utoronto.ca/neurons/index.swf This simple web-based tutorial is intended to be used early in the course to help you understand the most important basic concepts. Basic events in neuronal function, e.g. establishment of the resting membrane potential, action potentials, neurotransmitter release, post-synaptic mechanisms and axonal transport, are explained using minimal text and interactive, two-dimensional animations. 

http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/matthews/animate.html

http://www9.biostr.washington.edu/da.html

http://people.eku.edu/ritchisong/301notes2.htm

http://www.happinessinthisworld.com/wordpress/2009/06/07/how-to-remember-things/#more-2381

 

Date

Lec #

 Topic

Reading (pages)

Lecturer

M-Aug. 26

1

Introduction to course

Chapter 1

B Luscher

W-Aug. 28

2

Structure of neurons

Chapter 2

B Luscher

F-Aug. 30

3

Cells and behavior

Chapter 3

B Luscher

M-Sept. 2

 

MLK day– no classes

 

 

W-Sept. 4

4

Genes and Behavior, cytology of neurons

Chapter 4

B Luscher

F- Sept. 6

5

Cytology of neurons

Chapter 4

B Luscher

M-Sept. 9

6

Synthesis and trafficking of neural proteins

Chapter 4

B Luscher

W-Sept. 11

7

Ion Channels

Chapter 5

B Luscher

F-Sept. 13

8

Membrane potential

Chapter 6

B Luscher

M-Sept. 16

9

Passive electrical properties of neurons

Chapter 6

B Luscher

W-Sept. 18

10

Passive electrical properties of neurons

Chapter 6

B Luscher

F-Sept. 20

11

Review

n/a

B Luscher

M-Sept. 23

 

Exam 1

 

B Luscher

W-Sept. 25

12

Propagated signaling/action potential

Chapter 7

B Luscher

F-Sept. 27

13

Propagated signaling/action potential

Chapter 7

B Luscher

M-Sept. 30

14

Overview of synaptic transmission

Chapter 8

B Luscher

W-Oct. 2

15

The NMJ: Directly gated transmission

Chapter 9

B Luscher

F-Oct. 4

16

The NMJ: Directly gated transmission

Chapter 9

B Luscher

M-Oct. 7

17

Synaptic integration in the CNS

Chapter 10

B Luscher

W-Oct. 9

18

Synaptic integration in the CNS

Chapter 10

B Luscher

F-Oct. 11

19

Modulation of synaptic transm/2nd messenger syst

Chapter 11

B Luscher

M-Oct. 14

20

Modulation of synaptic transm/2nd messenger syst

Chapter 11

B Luscher

W-Oct. 16

21

Review

n/a

B Luscher

F-Oct. 18

 

Exam 2

 

B Luscher

M-Oct. 21

22

Neurobiology of glial cells

n/a

B Luscher

W-Oct. 23

23

Transmitter release

Chapter 12

B Luscher

F-Oct. 25

24

Transmitter release

Chapter 12

B Luscher

M-Oct. 28

25

Synthesis of Neurotransmitter

Chapter 13

B Luscher

W-Oct. 30

26

Uptake of Neurotransmitters

Chapter 13

B Luscher

F-Nov. 1

27

Induction and Patterning of the NS

Chapter 52

B Luscher

M-Nov. 4

28

Neurogenesis

Chapter 52

B Luscher

W-Nov. 6

29

Neurogenesis

Chapter 53

B Luscher

F-Nov. 8

30

Apoptosis

Chapter 53

B Luscher

M-Nov. 11

31

Review

n/a

B Luscher

W-Nov. 13

 

Exam 3                                         

 

B Luscher

F-Nov. 15

32

Axon guidance

Chapter 54

B Luscher

M-Nov. 18

33

Formation / elimination of synapses

Chapter 55

B Luscher

W-Nov. 20

34

Formation / elimination of synapses

Chapter 55

B Luscher

F-Nov. 22

35

Receptor trafficking and LTP

Chapter 67

B Luscher

Nov. 25-30

 

Thanksgiving Holiday

 

 

M-Dec 2

36

Receptor trafficking and LTP

Chapter 67

B Luscher

W-Dec 4

37

Alzheimer’s Disease

Chapter 59

B Luscher

F-Dec. 6

38

Alzheimer’s/Tauopathies

n/a

B Luscher

M-Dec 9

39

Huntington’s disease

n/a

B Luscher

W-Dec. 11

40

Huntington’s disease

n/a

B Luscher

F-Dec. 13

41

Review

n/a

B Luscher

M-Dec 16

 

Exam 4  (Final exam) 12:20-1:10AM, 101 Thomas

B Luscher